What Are the 5 Positions for Ballet?

Ballet

Ballet is a classical dance form that has been around for centuries. It is very structured and rigorous, with precise movements and postures that must be practiced to perfection in order to be successful. As such, there are certain positions which must be mastered in order to perform ballet steps correctly.

The five positions of ballet are the first, second, third, fourth and fifth positions. Each position is named for the placement of the feet on the floor, which determines the body’s alignment for each movement.

In all five ballet positions, the feet must remain parallel and turned out from the hips. The feet should never point inwards or cross over each other.

First Position: In first position, the heels of both feet are touching each other while both toes point outward away from each other at an angle of forty-five degrees. This position is used as a starting point for many steps and movements in ballet, including pliés (bending of the knees) and relevés (raising up onto the toes).

Second Position: Second position involves separating the heels of both feet by a distance equal to twice that of first position. This means that the heels are now two shoulder widths apart from each other, with both toes still pointing outward away from each other at an angle of forty-five degrees. This position is used for jumps and leaps as well as various turns and spins.

Third Position: Third position requires one foot to move forward so that it is one full step ahead of the other foot. The heel of one foot should touch the toe or arch of its partner foot while both toes are still pointed outward away from each other at an angle of forty-five degrees. Third position is often used to begin a series of pirouettes (spinning turns), en dehors (turning outwards) or en dedans (turning inwards).

Fourth Position: Fourth position requires both feet to move apart so that they form an equilateral triangle with their heels touching together while their toes point outward away from each other at an angle of forty-five degrees. This position can be used when transitioning between steps such as sissonnes (jumps), piqués (pointing toes) or changements (toe lifts).

Fifth Position: Fifth position also involves forming an equilateral triangle with both feet going slightly further apart than fourth position so that their heels do not touch anymore but rather form a straight line across from one another while their toes still point outward away from each other at an angle of forty-five degrees. Fifth position is often used for many different types of jumps and bourrées (gliding steps).

Conclusion:

Ballet has five distinct positions which require precise alignment in order to perform correctly and gracefully on stage – these five positions are first, second, third, fourth and fifth positions respectively. Mastering these positions will provide dancers with a strong foundation on which they can build more complex steps and movements within their ballet routine!